DUSC

This entry though short is not one of lesser admiration for the work of a young man who together with a team of about 4 other managers are slowly building soccer for women in Kenya to international standards. The entry is a reflection that a feminist is not restricted to a particular category of certain sex organs but rather a true love and respect for women and their capabilities.

Three of the women from Dagoretti United Sister’s Club, DUSC have been called to play in the World Cup qualifying match against Nigeria this coming April. These girls, Esther Nandika, Agnes Ocholla, Mercy Odero are only a small representation of a larger circle of women who through their own love for the game have kept it alive on parched soil, with little soccer equipment and not much support from their fellow male soccer players.

When the women began to win more and more games and collect sports equipment, the men began to say that the equipment really belonged to them. That women’s soccer was nothing serious and their support for their male counterparts was in giving them the prizes they had worked so hard to win.

There are no bounds to a woman’s sacrifice.

Congratulations to Esther, Agnes, Mercy and DUSC.

“DUSC we love you ‘coz you tisha!”

More on DUSC, the young man and the DUSC management team later.

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7 responses to “DUSC

  1. I agree, “there are no bounds to a woman’s sacrifice.” This situation helps show how women unify and work for a cause, many threads woven into a tapestry storyboard. They were given the chance to keep their love for soccer alive, and they worked to do so, and selflessly still support the unsupporting fellow male players. It is men who still believe in division of power and abilities…otherwise why would a male start and support this team and other males not support it?

  2. Kenyan males must support women in all thier endavors no question about it. Lornah kiplagat,Ndereba,congestina are a shining example. Mathare youth sports organization is aniother of the premier organized clubs to recognize this potential.More power to the phenomenal Kenyan woman.

  3. Doesnt the young man have a name?Or doesnt he get mention coz he’s a man?

  4. On the contrary the man was going to get his own post on this very blog with a link to his website. But since you ask so politely acolyte, he’s name is Kenyua Gachecheh and the other men include Coach Tievo and a foster father to the girls who is known by the name Muthee. I’ll have you know too that there are lots of women involved, many who I will mention later. Interested dear acolyte, in being one of the men behind this successful football team?

  5. Seeing as I am several thousand miles away that isnt possible.It just seems like the young man had been made peripheral to the teams’ achievements.

  6. I guess the only thing that keeps us down is ourselves. People say the sky is the limit and i wonder…..whats beyond the sky.
    In the same light as these women i say there are no limits. Congratulations! And i believe this is just one small step. The journey is far from over.

  7. Awesome!!! I wish them all the best!! I had the privilege of being part of a group of friends who bought kit and soccer balls for teams at the coast of Kenya last September. I was inspired by a team of girls in Ukunda. The main restrictions for them were religion (Islam) and traditional roles for women and girls combined with socio-cultural expectations.Sad about the loss of equipment to the men’s teams…

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